Directions

Ingredients

New Research: Women Read Minds Better Than Men


What kind of study was this?

This was a psychological assessment validation study, which means that researchers went through a multi-step process to develop a questionnaire that would detect some psychological phenomenon, and are now testing the questionnaire on real people to see if it works the way they expect it to work.

What did researchers want to know?

In this validation study, researchers wanted to know if this questionnaire actually measured mind-reading apart from “empathy” (feeling what another person is feeling) and autistic vs. non-autistic traits.

Mind reading is also known in psychological research as ‘mentalising,’ which is the ability to understand what another person is thinking by detecting subtle, non-verbal cues like facial expression and body posture.

What did the researchers actually do?

They gave the questionnaire to a bunch of people, both autistic and non-autistic. They also gave the same people other questionnaires so that their answers could be statistically compared to make sure the mentalising questionnaire was measuring something unique.

They also used statistical methods to make sure that different questions on the questionnaire acted the way the researchers expected them to act.

What did the researchers find?

They found that the questionnaire measured something unique apart from empathy and autistic vs. non-autistic behavior and that it is a valid assessment of mentalising. They also found that on average women scored higher in mentalising than men.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Hmmm. We’ll let everyone draw their own conclusions!

Original article:

Clutterbuck, R. A., Callan, M. J., Taylor, E. C., Livingston, L. A., & Shah, P. (2021). Development and validation of the Four-Item Mentalising Index. Psychological Assessment. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/pas0001004

Follow the New Research Tuesday topic to get notifications and stay updated on the latest research for family thriving!

New Research: Women Read Minds Better Than Men

Close
Theme icon

Podcast /

Content /

Flourish

New Research: Women Read Minds Better Than Men

Women are better than men at picking up on non-verbal cues that indicate what other people are thinking

Join The Family Thrive community and download the mobile app, all for free!

JOIN TODAY

Key takeaways

1

2

3

Low hassle, high nutrition

Fierce Food: Easy

Fierce Food: Easy

50/50 mixes of powerful veggies and starchy favorites

Fierce Food: Balance

Fierce Food: Balance

Maximize nutrients, minimize sugar and starch

Fierce Food: Power

Fierce Food: Power

Ingredients

Kitchen Equipment

Ingredient Replacement

View replacement list (PDF)

Reading time:

3 Minutes


What kind of study was this?

This was a psychological assessment validation study, which means that researchers went through a multi-step process to develop a questionnaire that would detect some psychological phenomenon, and are now testing the questionnaire on real people to see if it works the way they expect it to work.

What did researchers want to know?

In this validation study, researchers wanted to know if this questionnaire actually measured mind-reading apart from “empathy” (feeling what another person is feeling) and autistic vs. non-autistic traits.

Mind reading is also known in psychological research as ‘mentalising,’ which is the ability to understand what another person is thinking by detecting subtle, non-verbal cues like facial expression and body posture.

What did the researchers actually do?

They gave the questionnaire to a bunch of people, both autistic and non-autistic. They also gave the same people other questionnaires so that their answers could be statistically compared to make sure the mentalising questionnaire was measuring something unique.

They also used statistical methods to make sure that different questions on the questionnaire acted the way the researchers expected them to act.

What did the researchers find?

They found that the questionnaire measured something unique apart from empathy and autistic vs. non-autistic behavior and that it is a valid assessment of mentalising. They also found that on average women scored higher in mentalising than men.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Hmmm. We’ll let everyone draw their own conclusions!

Original article:

Clutterbuck, R. A., Callan, M. J., Taylor, E. C., Livingston, L. A., & Shah, P. (2021). Development and validation of the Four-Item Mentalising Index. Psychological Assessment. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/pas0001004

Follow the New Research Tuesday topic to get notifications and stay updated on the latest research for family thriving!


What kind of study was this?

This was a psychological assessment validation study, which means that researchers went through a multi-step process to develop a questionnaire that would detect some psychological phenomenon, and are now testing the questionnaire on real people to see if it works the way they expect it to work.

What did researchers want to know?

In this validation study, researchers wanted to know if this questionnaire actually measured mind-reading apart from “empathy” (feeling what another person is feeling) and autistic vs. non-autistic traits.

Mind reading is also known in psychological research as ‘mentalising,’ which is the ability to understand what another person is thinking by detecting subtle, non-verbal cues like facial expression and body posture.

What did the researchers actually do?

They gave the questionnaire to a bunch of people, both autistic and non-autistic. They also gave the same people other questionnaires so that their answers could be statistically compared to make sure the mentalising questionnaire was measuring something unique.

They also used statistical methods to make sure that different questions on the questionnaire acted the way the researchers expected them to act.

What did the researchers find?

They found that the questionnaire measured something unique apart from empathy and autistic vs. non-autistic behavior and that it is a valid assessment of mentalising. They also found that on average women scored higher in mentalising than men.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Hmmm. We’ll let everyone draw their own conclusions!

Original article:

Clutterbuck, R. A., Callan, M. J., Taylor, E. C., Livingston, L. A., & Shah, P. (2021). Development and validation of the Four-Item Mentalising Index. Psychological Assessment. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/pas0001004

Follow the New Research Tuesday topic to get notifications and stay updated on the latest research for family thriving!


What kind of study was this?

This was a psychological assessment validation study, which means that researchers went through a multi-step process to develop a questionnaire that would detect some psychological phenomenon, and are now testing the questionnaire on real people to see if it works the way they expect it to work.

What did researchers want to know?

In this validation study, researchers wanted to know if this questionnaire actually measured mind-reading apart from “empathy” (feeling what another person is feeling) and autistic vs. non-autistic traits.

Mind reading is also known in psychological research as ‘mentalising,’ which is the ability to understand what another person is thinking by detecting subtle, non-verbal cues like facial expression and body posture.

What did the researchers actually do?

They gave the questionnaire to a bunch of people, both autistic and non-autistic. They also gave the same people other questionnaires so that their answers could be statistically compared to make sure the mentalising questionnaire was measuring something unique.

They also used statistical methods to make sure that different questions on the questionnaire acted the way the researchers expected them to act.

What did the researchers find?

They found that the questionnaire measured something unique apart from empathy and autistic vs. non-autistic behavior and that it is a valid assessment of mentalising. They also found that on average women scored higher in mentalising than men.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Hmmm. We’ll let everyone draw their own conclusions!

Original article:

Clutterbuck, R. A., Callan, M. J., Taylor, E. C., Livingston, L. A., & Shah, P. (2021). Development and validation of the Four-Item Mentalising Index. Psychological Assessment. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/pas0001004

Follow the New Research Tuesday topic to get notifications and stay updated on the latest research for family thriving!

Enjoying this? Subscribe to The Family Thrive for more healthy recipes, video classes, and more.

Discover Nourish

See more
New Research: Women Read Minds Better Than Men

Podcast

Condimentum eu tortor bibendum.

By

Jackie Kovic

New Research: Women Read Minds Better Than Men

Podcast

Condimentum eu tortor bibendum.

By

Jackie Kovic

Podcast

Condimentum eu tortor bibendum.

By

Jackie Kovic

Give This a Try: 4-7-8 Breathing

Podcast

Give This a Try: 4-7-8 Breathing

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

Pod Wisdom: Three Ways to Boost Your Family’s Metabolic Health

Podcast

Pod Wisdom: Three Ways to Boost Your Family’s Metabolic Health

By

The Family Thrive Podcast

Podcast Ep. 11: Feeding Kids From Infancy Through Adulthood With Tiffani Ghere, RD, CSP, CLEC

Podcast

Podcast Ep. 11: Feeding Kids From Infancy Through Adulthood With Tiffani Ghere, RD, CSP, CLEC

By

The Family Thrive Podcast

Podcast Ep. 10: Tuning Into Intuition and Traditional Healing With Maria Barrera, LAc

Podcast

Podcast Ep. 10: Tuning Into Intuition and Traditional Healing With Maria Barrera, LAc

By

The Family Thrive Podcast

New Research: 7 Research-Backed Strategies to Help Your Kids Love Vegetables

Podcast

New Research: 7 Research-Backed Strategies to Help Your Kids Love Vegetables

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

Avocado Monster Mash Toast

Podcast

Avocado Monster Mash Toast

By

Alexia Hall, RDN

5 Ways to Identify and Prevent Parental Burnout

Podcast

5 Ways to Identify and Prevent Parental Burnout

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

Podcast Ep. 9:  What Parents Need to Know About Metabolic Health With Angela Poff, PhD, and Victoria Field

Podcast

Podcast Ep. 9: What Parents Need to Know About Metabolic Health With Angela Poff, PhD, and Victoria Field

By

The Family Thrive Podcast

Podcast Ep. 5: Blending Holistic Healing and Mainstream Pediatric Medicine With Ruth McCarty, DAMC, LAc

Podcast

Podcast Ep. 5: Blending Holistic Healing and Mainstream Pediatric Medicine With Ruth McCarty, DAMC, LAc

By

The Family Thrive Podcast

Podcast Ep. 8: How to Talk to Your Kids About Race and Ethnicity With Sofia Pertuz, PhD

Podcast

Podcast Ep. 8: How to Talk to Your Kids About Race and Ethnicity With Sofia Pertuz, PhD

By

The Family Thrive Podcast

Give This a Try: 4-7-8 Breathing

Give This a Try

Give This a Try: 4-7-8 Breathing

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

Pod Wisdom: Three Ways to Boost Your Family’s Metabolic Health

Pro Perspective

Pod Wisdom: Three Ways to Boost Your Family’s Metabolic Health

By

The Family Thrive Podcast

Podcast Ep. 11: Feeding Kids From Infancy Through Adulthood With Tiffani Ghere, RD, CSP, CLEC

Podcasts

Podcast Ep. 11: Feeding Kids From Infancy Through Adulthood With Tiffani Ghere, RD, CSP, CLEC

By

The Family Thrive Podcast

Podcast Ep. 10: Tuning Into Intuition and Traditional Healing With Maria Barrera, LAc

Podcasts

Podcast Ep. 10: Tuning Into Intuition and Traditional Healing With Maria Barrera, LAc

By

The Family Thrive Podcast

New Research: 7 Research-Backed Strategies to Help Your Kids Love Vegetables

New Research Tuesday

New Research: 7 Research-Backed Strategies to Help Your Kids Love Vegetables

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

Avocado Monster Mash Toast

Recipes

Avocado Monster Mash Toast

By

Alexia Hall, RDN

5 Ways to Identify and Prevent Parental Burnout

5 Things Friday

5 Ways to Identify and Prevent Parental Burnout

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

Podcast Ep. 9:  What Parents Need to Know About Metabolic Health With Angela Poff, PhD, and Victoria Field

Podcasts

Podcast Ep. 9: What Parents Need to Know About Metabolic Health With Angela Poff, PhD, and Victoria Field

By

The Family Thrive Podcast

Podcast Ep. 5: Blending Holistic Healing and Mainstream Pediatric Medicine With Ruth McCarty, DAMC, LAc

Podcasts

Podcast Ep. 5: Blending Holistic Healing and Mainstream Pediatric Medicine With Ruth McCarty, DAMC, LAc

By

The Family Thrive Podcast

Podcast Ep. 8: How to Talk to Your Kids About Race and Ethnicity With Sofia Pertuz, PhD

Podcasts

Podcast Ep. 8: How to Talk to Your Kids About Race and Ethnicity With Sofia Pertuz, PhD

By

The Family Thrive Podcast

Subscribe to get all the goods

Join for free
Login