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New Research: Why You Should Swap Your Pasta for Protein


What kind of study was this?

This was a “meta-analysis,” which means it’s an analysis of all the research that’s been done on a particular topic. No original research is done in a meta-analysis. Instead, researchers search all the relevant journals for studies on a particular topic. Then they take the data from those studies and compare and combine them to summarize what all the research has to say on that topic.

What did researchers want to know?

In this meta-analysis, researchers wanted to know what all the existing research showed us about the effect of reducing dietary carbohydrate and increasing dietary protein on blood pressure.

What did the researchers actually do?

They searched all peer-reviewed scientific journals for studies related to protein intake and blood pressure. They also asked professionals in the field about which studies they considered most important.

They found 40 randomized controlled trials where researchers had one group eat more protein and fewer carbs, and another group eat a higher carbohydrate diet, and then compared changes in blood pressure afterward.

They then used statistical methods to average out the change in blood pressure for the higher protein group compared with the higher carb group across all the studies.

What did the researchers find?

Compared to the higher carb groups, the higher protein groups had significantly lower blood pressure (“Significance” in scientific studies usually means that, statistically, it is very unlikely that if we were to do this study again that we would come up with drastically different results.).

They also found that blood pressure was reduced by generally the same amount whether the protein was from animals or plants.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

We generally don’t need to worry about blood pressure in kids, but for many of us parents, high blood pressure can be a health problem.

Reducing starchy and sugary carbohydrate foods and replacing them with any source of protein could help in maintaining healthy blood pressure levels.

Original article:

Casey M. Rebholz, Eleanor E. Friedman, Lindsey J. Powers, Whitney D. Arroyave, Jiang He, Tanika N. Kelly, Dietary Protein Intake and Blood Pressure: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials, American Journal of Epidemiology, Volume 176, Issue suppl_7, 1 October 2012, Pages S27–S43, https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kws245

New Research: Why You Should Swap Your Pasta for Protein

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New Research: Why You Should Swap Your Pasta for Protein

Find out how eating more protein and less carbohydrates (sugar, bread, pasta, processed potato products) leads to lower blood pressure.

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Low hassle, high nutrition

Fierce Food: Easy

Fierce Food: Easy

50/50 mixes of powerful veggies and starchy favorites

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Fierce Food: Balance

Maximize nutrients, minimize sugar and starch

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Fierce Food: Power

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Reading time:

3 Minutes


What kind of study was this?

This was a “meta-analysis,” which means it’s an analysis of all the research that’s been done on a particular topic. No original research is done in a meta-analysis. Instead, researchers search all the relevant journals for studies on a particular topic. Then they take the data from those studies and compare and combine them to summarize what all the research has to say on that topic.

What did researchers want to know?

In this meta-analysis, researchers wanted to know what all the existing research showed us about the effect of reducing dietary carbohydrate and increasing dietary protein on blood pressure.

What did the researchers actually do?

They searched all peer-reviewed scientific journals for studies related to protein intake and blood pressure. They also asked professionals in the field about which studies they considered most important.

They found 40 randomized controlled trials where researchers had one group eat more protein and fewer carbs, and another group eat a higher carbohydrate diet, and then compared changes in blood pressure afterward.

They then used statistical methods to average out the change in blood pressure for the higher protein group compared with the higher carb group across all the studies.

What did the researchers find?

Compared to the higher carb groups, the higher protein groups had significantly lower blood pressure (“Significance” in scientific studies usually means that, statistically, it is very unlikely that if we were to do this study again that we would come up with drastically different results.).

They also found that blood pressure was reduced by generally the same amount whether the protein was from animals or plants.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

We generally don’t need to worry about blood pressure in kids, but for many of us parents, high blood pressure can be a health problem.

Reducing starchy and sugary carbohydrate foods and replacing them with any source of protein could help in maintaining healthy blood pressure levels.

Original article:

Casey M. Rebholz, Eleanor E. Friedman, Lindsey J. Powers, Whitney D. Arroyave, Jiang He, Tanika N. Kelly, Dietary Protein Intake and Blood Pressure: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials, American Journal of Epidemiology, Volume 176, Issue suppl_7, 1 October 2012, Pages S27–S43, https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kws245


What kind of study was this?

This was a “meta-analysis,” which means it’s an analysis of all the research that’s been done on a particular topic. No original research is done in a meta-analysis. Instead, researchers search all the relevant journals for studies on a particular topic. Then they take the data from those studies and compare and combine them to summarize what all the research has to say on that topic.

What did researchers want to know?

In this meta-analysis, researchers wanted to know what all the existing research showed us about the effect of reducing dietary carbohydrate and increasing dietary protein on blood pressure.

What did the researchers actually do?

They searched all peer-reviewed scientific journals for studies related to protein intake and blood pressure. They also asked professionals in the field about which studies they considered most important.

They found 40 randomized controlled trials where researchers had one group eat more protein and fewer carbs, and another group eat a higher carbohydrate diet, and then compared changes in blood pressure afterward.

They then used statistical methods to average out the change in blood pressure for the higher protein group compared with the higher carb group across all the studies.

What did the researchers find?

Compared to the higher carb groups, the higher protein groups had significantly lower blood pressure (“Significance” in scientific studies usually means that, statistically, it is very unlikely that if we were to do this study again that we would come up with drastically different results.).

They also found that blood pressure was reduced by generally the same amount whether the protein was from animals or plants.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

We generally don’t need to worry about blood pressure in kids, but for many of us parents, high blood pressure can be a health problem.

Reducing starchy and sugary carbohydrate foods and replacing them with any source of protein could help in maintaining healthy blood pressure levels.

Original article:

Casey M. Rebholz, Eleanor E. Friedman, Lindsey J. Powers, Whitney D. Arroyave, Jiang He, Tanika N. Kelly, Dietary Protein Intake and Blood Pressure: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials, American Journal of Epidemiology, Volume 176, Issue suppl_7, 1 October 2012, Pages S27–S43, https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kws245


What kind of study was this?

This was a “meta-analysis,” which means it’s an analysis of all the research that’s been done on a particular topic. No original research is done in a meta-analysis. Instead, researchers search all the relevant journals for studies on a particular topic. Then they take the data from those studies and compare and combine them to summarize what all the research has to say on that topic.

What did researchers want to know?

In this meta-analysis, researchers wanted to know what all the existing research showed us about the effect of reducing dietary carbohydrate and increasing dietary protein on blood pressure.

What did the researchers actually do?

They searched all peer-reviewed scientific journals for studies related to protein intake and blood pressure. They also asked professionals in the field about which studies they considered most important.

They found 40 randomized controlled trials where researchers had one group eat more protein and fewer carbs, and another group eat a higher carbohydrate diet, and then compared changes in blood pressure afterward.

They then used statistical methods to average out the change in blood pressure for the higher protein group compared with the higher carb group across all the studies.

What did the researchers find?

Compared to the higher carb groups, the higher protein groups had significantly lower blood pressure (“Significance” in scientific studies usually means that, statistically, it is very unlikely that if we were to do this study again that we would come up with drastically different results.).

They also found that blood pressure was reduced by generally the same amount whether the protein was from animals or plants.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

We generally don’t need to worry about blood pressure in kids, but for many of us parents, high blood pressure can be a health problem.

Reducing starchy and sugary carbohydrate foods and replacing them with any source of protein could help in maintaining healthy blood pressure levels.

Original article:

Casey M. Rebholz, Eleanor E. Friedman, Lindsey J. Powers, Whitney D. Arroyave, Jiang He, Tanika N. Kelly, Dietary Protein Intake and Blood Pressure: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials, American Journal of Epidemiology, Volume 176, Issue suppl_7, 1 October 2012, Pages S27–S43, https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kws245

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