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Pod Wisdom: The Health and Wellness Benefits of Sage

In episode 10, Maria Barrera, LAc, described using sage in a traditional way as a purification ritual. This is called "smudging" and is an ancient practice in Native American or First Nation communities. A different type of sage, known as red sage, is also used in Traditional Chinese Medicine as an herb that is thought to improve cardiovascular, kidney, and bone health.

3 ways to use sage

1. Essential oil
The essential oils from white sage may have antimicrobial properties. Talk to your doctor before applying sage essential oil topically.

2. Tea or tincture for cardiovascular health
Chinese red sage (Salvia miltiorrhiza) is used primarily as a tincture or a tea. It's been used for thousands of years to treat cardiovascular problems, and may work through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

3. Burning sage
This is Native American or First Nation practice is often called "smudging" and involves bundled sage plants that are burnt slowly to produce smoke. The smoke is believed to purify the surrounding space.

No scientific studies have been conducted on this practice, but outside of the lung irritation of breathing in smoke, the practice is very low risk. From a scientific perspective, it can be a psychologically soothing ritual to reduce stress associated with a particular place.

Pod Wisdom: The Health and Wellness Benefits of Sage

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Pod Wisdom: The Health and Wellness Benefits of Sage

Let's learn how these simple applications of sage can benefit your home!

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Key takeaways

1

In The Family Thrive Podcast Ep. 10, Maria Barrera, LAc talks about using traditional herbs and spices in her own family's health and wellness.

2

Through her work, Maria has found similarities between her Mexican grandmother's home remedies and Traditional Chinese Medicine herbs.

3

Sage is an herb used in both traditions for healing, cleansing, and cardiovascular health.

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In episode 10, Maria Barrera, LAc, described using sage in a traditional way as a purification ritual. This is called "smudging" and is an ancient practice in Native American or First Nation communities. A different type of sage, known as red sage, is also used in Traditional Chinese Medicine as an herb that is thought to improve cardiovascular, kidney, and bone health.

3 ways to use sage

1. Essential oil
The essential oils from white sage may have antimicrobial properties. Talk to your doctor before applying sage essential oil topically.

2. Tea or tincture for cardiovascular health
Chinese red sage (Salvia miltiorrhiza) is used primarily as a tincture or a tea. It's been used for thousands of years to treat cardiovascular problems, and may work through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

3. Burning sage
This is Native American or First Nation practice is often called "smudging" and involves bundled sage plants that are burnt slowly to produce smoke. The smoke is believed to purify the surrounding space.

No scientific studies have been conducted on this practice, but outside of the lung irritation of breathing in smoke, the practice is very low risk. From a scientific perspective, it can be a psychologically soothing ritual to reduce stress associated with a particular place.

In episode 10, Maria Barrera, LAc, described using sage in a traditional way as a purification ritual. This is called "smudging" and is an ancient practice in Native American or First Nation communities. A different type of sage, known as red sage, is also used in Traditional Chinese Medicine as an herb that is thought to improve cardiovascular, kidney, and bone health.

3 ways to use sage

1. Essential oil
The essential oils from white sage may have antimicrobial properties. Talk to your doctor before applying sage essential oil topically.

2. Tea or tincture for cardiovascular health
Chinese red sage (Salvia miltiorrhiza) is used primarily as a tincture or a tea. It's been used for thousands of years to treat cardiovascular problems, and may work through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

3. Burning sage
This is Native American or First Nation practice is often called "smudging" and involves bundled sage plants that are burnt slowly to produce smoke. The smoke is believed to purify the surrounding space.

No scientific studies have been conducted on this practice, but outside of the lung irritation of breathing in smoke, the practice is very low risk. From a scientific perspective, it can be a psychologically soothing ritual to reduce stress associated with a particular place.

In episode 10, Maria Barrera, LAc, described using sage in a traditional way as a purification ritual. This is called "smudging" and is an ancient practice in Native American or First Nation communities. A different type of sage, known as red sage, is also used in Traditional Chinese Medicine as an herb that is thought to improve cardiovascular, kidney, and bone health.

3 ways to use sage

1. Essential oil
The essential oils from white sage may have antimicrobial properties. Talk to your doctor before applying sage essential oil topically.

2. Tea or tincture for cardiovascular health
Chinese red sage (Salvia miltiorrhiza) is used primarily as a tincture or a tea. It's been used for thousands of years to treat cardiovascular problems, and may work through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

3. Burning sage
This is Native American or First Nation practice is often called "smudging" and involves bundled sage plants that are burnt slowly to produce smoke. The smoke is believed to purify the surrounding space.

No scientific studies have been conducted on this practice, but outside of the lung irritation of breathing in smoke, the practice is very low risk. From a scientific perspective, it can be a psychologically soothing ritual to reduce stress associated with a particular place.

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