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Pod Wisdom: One Traditional Chinese Medicine Practice Parents Can Do at Home

On episode 5, Dr. Ruth McCarty, a licensed practitioner of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), explained how TCM works:

"Traditional Chinese Medicine is a very old and eloquent system of medicine that . . . helps the body heal itself. It helps put harmony and balance into pathologies or illness of the body, the spirit, or the mind. It looks at the body as a whole kind of component to heal itself."

TCM practices are focused on restoring "harmony and balance" of internal energy, or qi, in the body. TCM is blended with conventional Western medicine in many of the top U.S. medical centers like Memorial Sloane Kettering Cancer Center, UCLA, and Stanford. Dr. McCarty practices in-patient TCM at Children's Hospital of Orange County.

While most TCM must be done by an experienced, licensed practitioner, acupressure can be done by parents at home.

Acupressure for parents and kids at home

Acupressure in TCM works by applying gentle pressure at specific points in the body where qi, or internal energy, gets blocked. This energy blockage, in TCM philosophy, causes illness.

These points are easy to learn and parents can use these techniques everyday for pain relief, relaxation, or upset tummies.

1. Upset tummies. Find the pressure point called P6 (Nei Guan) by placing your child's three fingers just below their wrist as seen below. Then place your thumb directly below their index finger. This is P6.

Move your thumb in a circle while applying pressure for 2-3 minutes. You can be firm in the pressure, but of course not too hard that it hurts. Afterwards, switch to the other wrist.

2. Pain and headaches. Find the pressure point called LI-4 (Hegu) by placing your thumb between the base of your thumb and index finder as seen below.

Apply pressure for 5 minutes. Be firm but not so hard that it hurts. Afterwards, switch to the other hand.

3. Stress and anxiety. Find the pressure point called Extra-1 (Yin Tang) by placing your thumb or forefinger between your child's eyebrows as in the image below. Apply gentle pressure for 5-10 minutes.

This can be done several times a day or whenever symptoms arise.

Pod Wisdom: One Traditional Chinese Medicine Practice Parents Can Do at Home

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Pod Wisdom: One Traditional Chinese Medicine Practice Parents Can Do at Home

TCM is based on an ancient set of ideas around the importance of internal energy or life force, called qi. While most TCM must be done by an experienced, licensed practitioner, acupressure can be done by parents at home!

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On episode 5, Dr. Ruth McCarty, a licensed practitioner of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), explained how TCM works:

"Traditional Chinese Medicine is a very old and eloquent system of medicine that . . . helps the body heal itself. It helps put harmony and balance into pathologies or illness of the body, the spirit, or the mind. It looks at the body as a whole kind of component to heal itself."

TCM practices are focused on restoring "harmony and balance" of internal energy, or qi, in the body. TCM is blended with conventional Western medicine in many of the top U.S. medical centers like Memorial Sloane Kettering Cancer Center, UCLA, and Stanford. Dr. McCarty practices in-patient TCM at Children's Hospital of Orange County.

While most TCM must be done by an experienced, licensed practitioner, acupressure can be done by parents at home.

Acupressure for parents and kids at home

Acupressure in TCM works by applying gentle pressure at specific points in the body where qi, or internal energy, gets blocked. This energy blockage, in TCM philosophy, causes illness.

These points are easy to learn and parents can use these techniques everyday for pain relief, relaxation, or upset tummies.

1. Upset tummies. Find the pressure point called P6 (Nei Guan) by placing your child's three fingers just below their wrist as seen below. Then place your thumb directly below their index finger. This is P6.

Move your thumb in a circle while applying pressure for 2-3 minutes. You can be firm in the pressure, but of course not too hard that it hurts. Afterwards, switch to the other wrist.

2. Pain and headaches. Find the pressure point called LI-4 (Hegu) by placing your thumb between the base of your thumb and index finder as seen below.

Apply pressure for 5 minutes. Be firm but not so hard that it hurts. Afterwards, switch to the other hand.

3. Stress and anxiety. Find the pressure point called Extra-1 (Yin Tang) by placing your thumb or forefinger between your child's eyebrows as in the image below. Apply gentle pressure for 5-10 minutes.

This can be done several times a day or whenever symptoms arise.

On episode 5, Dr. Ruth McCarty, a licensed practitioner of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), explained how TCM works:

"Traditional Chinese Medicine is a very old and eloquent system of medicine that . . . helps the body heal itself. It helps put harmony and balance into pathologies or illness of the body, the spirit, or the mind. It looks at the body as a whole kind of component to heal itself."

TCM practices are focused on restoring "harmony and balance" of internal energy, or qi, in the body. TCM is blended with conventional Western medicine in many of the top U.S. medical centers like Memorial Sloane Kettering Cancer Center, UCLA, and Stanford. Dr. McCarty practices in-patient TCM at Children's Hospital of Orange County.

While most TCM must be done by an experienced, licensed practitioner, acupressure can be done by parents at home.

Acupressure for parents and kids at home

Acupressure in TCM works by applying gentle pressure at specific points in the body where qi, or internal energy, gets blocked. This energy blockage, in TCM philosophy, causes illness.

These points are easy to learn and parents can use these techniques everyday for pain relief, relaxation, or upset tummies.

1. Upset tummies. Find the pressure point called P6 (Nei Guan) by placing your child's three fingers just below their wrist as seen below. Then place your thumb directly below their index finger. This is P6.

Move your thumb in a circle while applying pressure for 2-3 minutes. You can be firm in the pressure, but of course not too hard that it hurts. Afterwards, switch to the other wrist.

2. Pain and headaches. Find the pressure point called LI-4 (Hegu) by placing your thumb between the base of your thumb and index finder as seen below.

Apply pressure for 5 minutes. Be firm but not so hard that it hurts. Afterwards, switch to the other hand.

3. Stress and anxiety. Find the pressure point called Extra-1 (Yin Tang) by placing your thumb or forefinger between your child's eyebrows as in the image below. Apply gentle pressure for 5-10 minutes.

This can be done several times a day or whenever symptoms arise.

On episode 5, Dr. Ruth McCarty, a licensed practitioner of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), explained how TCM works:

"Traditional Chinese Medicine is a very old and eloquent system of medicine that . . . helps the body heal itself. It helps put harmony and balance into pathologies or illness of the body, the spirit, or the mind. It looks at the body as a whole kind of component to heal itself."

TCM practices are focused on restoring "harmony and balance" of internal energy, or qi, in the body. TCM is blended with conventional Western medicine in many of the top U.S. medical centers like Memorial Sloane Kettering Cancer Center, UCLA, and Stanford. Dr. McCarty practices in-patient TCM at Children's Hospital of Orange County.

While most TCM must be done by an experienced, licensed practitioner, acupressure can be done by parents at home.

Acupressure for parents and kids at home

Acupressure in TCM works by applying gentle pressure at specific points in the body where qi, or internal energy, gets blocked. This energy blockage, in TCM philosophy, causes illness.

These points are easy to learn and parents can use these techniques everyday for pain relief, relaxation, or upset tummies.

1. Upset tummies. Find the pressure point called P6 (Nei Guan) by placing your child's three fingers just below their wrist as seen below. Then place your thumb directly below their index finger. This is P6.

Move your thumb in a circle while applying pressure for 2-3 minutes. You can be firm in the pressure, but of course not too hard that it hurts. Afterwards, switch to the other wrist.

2. Pain and headaches. Find the pressure point called LI-4 (Hegu) by placing your thumb between the base of your thumb and index finder as seen below.

Apply pressure for 5 minutes. Be firm but not so hard that it hurts. Afterwards, switch to the other hand.

3. Stress and anxiety. Find the pressure point called Extra-1 (Yin Tang) by placing your thumb or forefinger between your child's eyebrows as in the image below. Apply gentle pressure for 5-10 minutes.

This can be done several times a day or whenever symptoms arise.

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