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New Research: One science-backed trick for parents to build stronger muscles

What kind of study was this?

This was a systematic review, which means that researchers set out to review all the previous research published on a particular topic, usually within a particular time range. A systematic review will often summarize the findings qualitatively, in writing, rather than through a quantitative summary.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know what the research suggests about the effects of lifting weights fast vs. slow on muscle strength and size.  

What did the researchers actually do?

Before starting the review they decided what types of studies they would include and exclude (these are known as inclusion and exclusion criteria). They decided they’d only review studies that examined tempo of movement in any type of weight-lifting. They then narratively described what various studies showed for weightlifting tempo on muscle strength and size.

What did the researchers find?

They found that both fast and slow weightlifting improves muscle strength and size but the best way to improve muscle strength and size is faster lifting and contracting (what scientists call “concentric” movement) and slower releasing of releasing (what scientists call “eccentric movement”). If you imagine doing bicep curls, this would mean lifting the weight up and toward your body faster, and bringing the weight down slower.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

If you and your kids lift weights, you can use this tip to build more strength and muscle size with the same amount of reps. In case you were wondering, under proper supervision, weightlifting is perfectly healthy for kids according to the Mayo Clinic, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and scientific reviews.

Original article:
Wilk M, Zajac A, Tufano JJ. The Influence of Movement Tempo During Resistance Training on Muscular Strength and Hypertrophy Responses: A Review. Sports Med. 2021 Aug;51(8):1629-1650. doi: 10.1007/s40279-021-01465-2. Epub 2021 May 27. PMID: 34043184; PMCID: PMC8310485.

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New Research: One science-backed trick for parents to build stronger muscles

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Key takeaways

1

What’s better: lifting weights fast or slow?

2

These researchers reviewed all the studies that examined weightlifting tempo in the last 35 years

3

They found that the best way to build strength and muscle size is lifting (concentric movement) fast and releasing (eccentric movement) slowly

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Reading time:

3 minutes

What kind of study was this?

This was a systematic review, which means that researchers set out to review all the previous research published on a particular topic, usually within a particular time range. A systematic review will often summarize the findings qualitatively, in writing, rather than through a quantitative summary.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know what the research suggests about the effects of lifting weights fast vs. slow on muscle strength and size.  

What did the researchers actually do?

Before starting the review they decided what types of studies they would include and exclude (these are known as inclusion and exclusion criteria). They decided they’d only review studies that examined tempo of movement in any type of weight-lifting. They then narratively described what various studies showed for weightlifting tempo on muscle strength and size.

What did the researchers find?

They found that both fast and slow weightlifting improves muscle strength and size but the best way to improve muscle strength and size is faster lifting and contracting (what scientists call “concentric” movement) and slower releasing of releasing (what scientists call “eccentric movement”). If you imagine doing bicep curls, this would mean lifting the weight up and toward your body faster, and bringing the weight down slower.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

If you and your kids lift weights, you can use this tip to build more strength and muscle size with the same amount of reps. In case you were wondering, under proper supervision, weightlifting is perfectly healthy for kids according to the Mayo Clinic, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and scientific reviews.

Original article:
Wilk M, Zajac A, Tufano JJ. The Influence of Movement Tempo During Resistance Training on Muscular Strength and Hypertrophy Responses: A Review. Sports Med. 2021 Aug;51(8):1629-1650. doi: 10.1007/s40279-021-01465-2. Epub 2021 May 27. PMID: 34043184; PMCID: PMC8310485.

What kind of study was this?

This was a systematic review, which means that researchers set out to review all the previous research published on a particular topic, usually within a particular time range. A systematic review will often summarize the findings qualitatively, in writing, rather than through a quantitative summary.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know what the research suggests about the effects of lifting weights fast vs. slow on muscle strength and size.  

What did the researchers actually do?

Before starting the review they decided what types of studies they would include and exclude (these are known as inclusion and exclusion criteria). They decided they’d only review studies that examined tempo of movement in any type of weight-lifting. They then narratively described what various studies showed for weightlifting tempo on muscle strength and size.

What did the researchers find?

They found that both fast and slow weightlifting improves muscle strength and size but the best way to improve muscle strength and size is faster lifting and contracting (what scientists call “concentric” movement) and slower releasing of releasing (what scientists call “eccentric movement”). If you imagine doing bicep curls, this would mean lifting the weight up and toward your body faster, and bringing the weight down slower.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

If you and your kids lift weights, you can use this tip to build more strength and muscle size with the same amount of reps. In case you were wondering, under proper supervision, weightlifting is perfectly healthy for kids according to the Mayo Clinic, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and scientific reviews.

Original article:
Wilk M, Zajac A, Tufano JJ. The Influence of Movement Tempo During Resistance Training on Muscular Strength and Hypertrophy Responses: A Review. Sports Med. 2021 Aug;51(8):1629-1650. doi: 10.1007/s40279-021-01465-2. Epub 2021 May 27. PMID: 34043184; PMCID: PMC8310485.

What kind of study was this?

This was a systematic review, which means that researchers set out to review all the previous research published on a particular topic, usually within a particular time range. A systematic review will often summarize the findings qualitatively, in writing, rather than through a quantitative summary.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know what the research suggests about the effects of lifting weights fast vs. slow on muscle strength and size.  

What did the researchers actually do?

Before starting the review they decided what types of studies they would include and exclude (these are known as inclusion and exclusion criteria). They decided they’d only review studies that examined tempo of movement in any type of weight-lifting. They then narratively described what various studies showed for weightlifting tempo on muscle strength and size.

What did the researchers find?

They found that both fast and slow weightlifting improves muscle strength and size but the best way to improve muscle strength and size is faster lifting and contracting (what scientists call “concentric” movement) and slower releasing of releasing (what scientists call “eccentric movement”). If you imagine doing bicep curls, this would mean lifting the weight up and toward your body faster, and bringing the weight down slower.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

If you and your kids lift weights, you can use this tip to build more strength and muscle size with the same amount of reps. In case you were wondering, under proper supervision, weightlifting is perfectly healthy for kids according to the Mayo Clinic, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and scientific reviews.

Original article:
Wilk M, Zajac A, Tufano JJ. The Influence of Movement Tempo During Resistance Training on Muscular Strength and Hypertrophy Responses: A Review. Sports Med. 2021 Aug;51(8):1629-1650. doi: 10.1007/s40279-021-01465-2. Epub 2021 May 27. PMID: 34043184; PMCID: PMC8310485.

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