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5 Things Every Parent Should Know About Coffee

The myth of coffee being a guilty pleasure—that it must be bad for us somehow, and we’d be better off if we could only quit—has been around for far too long. The science around coffee paints a very different picture.

Whether it’s huge observational studies that simply ask people how much coffee they drink and what kind of health problems they have, or highly sophisticated laboratory studies looking at biochemical and genetic pathways, coffee looks to be a surprisingly healthy elixir.

Here are 5 things every parent should know about coffee (and keep in mind as they enjoy their morning joe):

1. Coffee sets your body's internal clock for the day

Well, it’s actually the caffeine in coffee. But nevertheless, our morning (caffeinated) coffee triggers internal clocks (aka, circadian rhythms) in our cells that signal to our body that it’s time to start the day and get active.

In this study, coffee’s clock setting is also associated with reduced inflammation and lower genetic expressions related to chronic disease. So, sip that coffee in the morning with joy and confidence!

2. Coffee may slow the aging process

That’s right, that delicious dark brew has been shown to reduce DNA breakdown in cells in this randomized, controlled trial, and is associated with limiting telomere shortening, a key marker of cellular aging, in this large observational study. Researchers believe it’s the antioxidants in coffee that give it this anti-aging power.

3. Coffee may improve cognition

Do you feel smarter after your morning coffee? Science suggests that this may actually be the case. This study showed that individuals who drank both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee had higher scores on cognitive tests than individuals who just had a coffee-flavored beverage that didn’t have real coffee in it.

A similar study in rats showed that coffee but not caffeine improved a range of outcomes related to brain health. Observational studies have shown better cognition in old age, lower rates of dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease in those who drink the most coffee versus those who drink the least.

4. Coffee may extend your life

Do you like living? If so, coffee is for you! Dozens of large observational studies have shown that individuals with the highest daily consumption have lower rates of death due to cancer, heart disease, neurological diseases, and all causes combined.

5. Coffee may reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes

While there are many more important factors contributing to type 2 diabetes risk, coffee may need to be added to the list of those factors that lower risk. In this observational study, those who consumed at least 3 cups a day (!) had a 42% reduced risk. And in this study of 450,000 people, each cup of coffee a day was associated with a 7% decline in risk.

5 Things Every Parent Should Know About Coffee

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5 Things Every Parent Should Know About Coffee

Spoiler Alert: Coffee can actually be good for you!

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Key takeaways

1

A lot of people are under the impression that coffee may have negative health effects

2

On the contrary, a large body of research shows that coffee, outside of pregnancy, may actually have health benefits for most people

3

Coffee may slow the aging process and may also improve cognition

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The myth of coffee being a guilty pleasure—that it must be bad for us somehow, and we’d be better off if we could only quit—has been around for far too long. The science around coffee paints a very different picture.

Whether it’s huge observational studies that simply ask people how much coffee they drink and what kind of health problems they have, or highly sophisticated laboratory studies looking at biochemical and genetic pathways, coffee looks to be a surprisingly healthy elixir.

Here are 5 things every parent should know about coffee (and keep in mind as they enjoy their morning joe):

1. Coffee sets your body's internal clock for the day

Well, it’s actually the caffeine in coffee. But nevertheless, our morning (caffeinated) coffee triggers internal clocks (aka, circadian rhythms) in our cells that signal to our body that it’s time to start the day and get active.

In this study, coffee’s clock setting is also associated with reduced inflammation and lower genetic expressions related to chronic disease. So, sip that coffee in the morning with joy and confidence!

2. Coffee may slow the aging process

That’s right, that delicious dark brew has been shown to reduce DNA breakdown in cells in this randomized, controlled trial, and is associated with limiting telomere shortening, a key marker of cellular aging, in this large observational study. Researchers believe it’s the antioxidants in coffee that give it this anti-aging power.

3. Coffee may improve cognition

Do you feel smarter after your morning coffee? Science suggests that this may actually be the case. This study showed that individuals who drank both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee had higher scores on cognitive tests than individuals who just had a coffee-flavored beverage that didn’t have real coffee in it.

A similar study in rats showed that coffee but not caffeine improved a range of outcomes related to brain health. Observational studies have shown better cognition in old age, lower rates of dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease in those who drink the most coffee versus those who drink the least.

4. Coffee may extend your life

Do you like living? If so, coffee is for you! Dozens of large observational studies have shown that individuals with the highest daily consumption have lower rates of death due to cancer, heart disease, neurological diseases, and all causes combined.

5. Coffee may reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes

While there are many more important factors contributing to type 2 diabetes risk, coffee may need to be added to the list of those factors that lower risk. In this observational study, those who consumed at least 3 cups a day (!) had a 42% reduced risk. And in this study of 450,000 people, each cup of coffee a day was associated with a 7% decline in risk.

The myth of coffee being a guilty pleasure—that it must be bad for us somehow, and we’d be better off if we could only quit—has been around for far too long. The science around coffee paints a very different picture.

Whether it’s huge observational studies that simply ask people how much coffee they drink and what kind of health problems they have, or highly sophisticated laboratory studies looking at biochemical and genetic pathways, coffee looks to be a surprisingly healthy elixir.

Here are 5 things every parent should know about coffee (and keep in mind as they enjoy their morning joe):

1. Coffee sets your body's internal clock for the day

Well, it’s actually the caffeine in coffee. But nevertheless, our morning (caffeinated) coffee triggers internal clocks (aka, circadian rhythms) in our cells that signal to our body that it’s time to start the day and get active.

In this study, coffee’s clock setting is also associated with reduced inflammation and lower genetic expressions related to chronic disease. So, sip that coffee in the morning with joy and confidence!

2. Coffee may slow the aging process

That’s right, that delicious dark brew has been shown to reduce DNA breakdown in cells in this randomized, controlled trial, and is associated with limiting telomere shortening, a key marker of cellular aging, in this large observational study. Researchers believe it’s the antioxidants in coffee that give it this anti-aging power.

3. Coffee may improve cognition

Do you feel smarter after your morning coffee? Science suggests that this may actually be the case. This study showed that individuals who drank both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee had higher scores on cognitive tests than individuals who just had a coffee-flavored beverage that didn’t have real coffee in it.

A similar study in rats showed that coffee but not caffeine improved a range of outcomes related to brain health. Observational studies have shown better cognition in old age, lower rates of dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease in those who drink the most coffee versus those who drink the least.

4. Coffee may extend your life

Do you like living? If so, coffee is for you! Dozens of large observational studies have shown that individuals with the highest daily consumption have lower rates of death due to cancer, heart disease, neurological diseases, and all causes combined.

5. Coffee may reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes

While there are many more important factors contributing to type 2 diabetes risk, coffee may need to be added to the list of those factors that lower risk. In this observational study, those who consumed at least 3 cups a day (!) had a 42% reduced risk. And in this study of 450,000 people, each cup of coffee a day was associated with a 7% decline in risk.

The myth of coffee being a guilty pleasure—that it must be bad for us somehow, and we’d be better off if we could only quit—has been around for far too long. The science around coffee paints a very different picture.

Whether it’s huge observational studies that simply ask people how much coffee they drink and what kind of health problems they have, or highly sophisticated laboratory studies looking at biochemical and genetic pathways, coffee looks to be a surprisingly healthy elixir.

Here are 5 things every parent should know about coffee (and keep in mind as they enjoy their morning joe):

1. Coffee sets your body's internal clock for the day

Well, it’s actually the caffeine in coffee. But nevertheless, our morning (caffeinated) coffee triggers internal clocks (aka, circadian rhythms) in our cells that signal to our body that it’s time to start the day and get active.

In this study, coffee’s clock setting is also associated with reduced inflammation and lower genetic expressions related to chronic disease. So, sip that coffee in the morning with joy and confidence!

2. Coffee may slow the aging process

That’s right, that delicious dark brew has been shown to reduce DNA breakdown in cells in this randomized, controlled trial, and is associated with limiting telomere shortening, a key marker of cellular aging, in this large observational study. Researchers believe it’s the antioxidants in coffee that give it this anti-aging power.

3. Coffee may improve cognition

Do you feel smarter after your morning coffee? Science suggests that this may actually be the case. This study showed that individuals who drank both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee had higher scores on cognitive tests than individuals who just had a coffee-flavored beverage that didn’t have real coffee in it.

A similar study in rats showed that coffee but not caffeine improved a range of outcomes related to brain health. Observational studies have shown better cognition in old age, lower rates of dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease in those who drink the most coffee versus those who drink the least.

4. Coffee may extend your life

Do you like living? If so, coffee is for you! Dozens of large observational studies have shown that individuals with the highest daily consumption have lower rates of death due to cancer, heart disease, neurological diseases, and all causes combined.

5. Coffee may reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes

While there are many more important factors contributing to type 2 diabetes risk, coffee may need to be added to the list of those factors that lower risk. In this observational study, those who consumed at least 3 cups a day (!) had a 42% reduced risk. And in this study of 450,000 people, each cup of coffee a day was associated with a 7% decline in risk.

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