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5 Reasons Parents Need to Prioritize Great Sleep

Reason 1: Your parent brain will work better

When we get great sleep, our brains produce more of a protein called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). It’s a molecule responsible for forming new neurons in the brain (neurogenesis) and boosting the brain’s ability to adapt and grow in response practice and new environments (neuroplasticity).

It increases with the total amount of sleep and REM sleep you get. You can trick your body and brain into getting more total sleep by taking different sleep supplements, but getting more REM sleep requires you to take care of your stress levels (get on a meditation routine), eating times (don’t eat late), and alcohol intake (the less the better). Studies also show that stress reduces BDNF by disrupting our sleep, and the interplay of stress and poor sleep can contribute to depression.

Reason 2: Poor sleep affects kids’ moods

The amount of sleep, its quality, and its timing each have substantial effects on mood for both kids and adults.

Feelings of anxiety or depression, or outbursts of anger or sadness, can all be caused by poor sleep. Sometimes we think the world is crashing down when all we need is some really good sleep.

By focusing on great sleep not just for kids but for ourselves as well, we’re setting everyone up for extra smiles.

Reason 3: Poor sleep affects kids’ grades

Research clearly shows that poor sleep keeps us from being able to combine new experiences and information with old ones, which in turn keeps us from being able to learn.

This correlation between sleep and brain health has been shown in laboratory settings, and in real-world settings of schools and home life. Sleep duration, sleep quality, and sleep consistency are all associated with better grades. Sleep is a powerful academic performance enhancer!

Reason 4: Great sleep promotes kids’ growth

The brain releases growth hormone during deep sleep, and different cells in the body regenerate during different sleep stages.

Only long, high-quality sleep will allow the brain to cycle through all five stages of sleep multiple times. Prioritizing sleep is prioritizing a strong, healthy body.

Reason 5: Sleep gets disrupted during the school year

Unfortunately, our kids face a huge roadblock to great sleep every single year: school. Studies show that sleep is especially disrupted for kids when the school year starts. Experts recommend that parents watch bedtimes closely throughout the school year and try to make weekend bedtimes as similar to weekday bedtimes as possible.

All this makes it even more important that full, healthy sleep is a focus of our families’ daily routines.

5 Reasons Parents Need to Prioritize Great Sleep

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5 Reasons Parents Need to Prioritize Great Sleep

Families are busier than ever and sleep often drops to the bottom of our to-do lists! Here are 5 reasons to push sleep back to the top of your priorities.

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Reason 1: Your parent brain will work better

When we get great sleep, our brains produce more of a protein called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). It’s a molecule responsible for forming new neurons in the brain (neurogenesis) and boosting the brain’s ability to adapt and grow in response practice and new environments (neuroplasticity).

It increases with the total amount of sleep and REM sleep you get. You can trick your body and brain into getting more total sleep by taking different sleep supplements, but getting more REM sleep requires you to take care of your stress levels (get on a meditation routine), eating times (don’t eat late), and alcohol intake (the less the better). Studies also show that stress reduces BDNF by disrupting our sleep, and the interplay of stress and poor sleep can contribute to depression.

Reason 2: Poor sleep affects kids’ moods

The amount of sleep, its quality, and its timing each have substantial effects on mood for both kids and adults.

Feelings of anxiety or depression, or outbursts of anger or sadness, can all be caused by poor sleep. Sometimes we think the world is crashing down when all we need is some really good sleep.

By focusing on great sleep not just for kids but for ourselves as well, we’re setting everyone up for extra smiles.

Reason 3: Poor sleep affects kids’ grades

Research clearly shows that poor sleep keeps us from being able to combine new experiences and information with old ones, which in turn keeps us from being able to learn.

This correlation between sleep and brain health has been shown in laboratory settings, and in real-world settings of schools and home life. Sleep duration, sleep quality, and sleep consistency are all associated with better grades. Sleep is a powerful academic performance enhancer!

Reason 4: Great sleep promotes kids’ growth

The brain releases growth hormone during deep sleep, and different cells in the body regenerate during different sleep stages.

Only long, high-quality sleep will allow the brain to cycle through all five stages of sleep multiple times. Prioritizing sleep is prioritizing a strong, healthy body.

Reason 5: Sleep gets disrupted during the school year

Unfortunately, our kids face a huge roadblock to great sleep every single year: school. Studies show that sleep is especially disrupted for kids when the school year starts. Experts recommend that parents watch bedtimes closely throughout the school year and try to make weekend bedtimes as similar to weekday bedtimes as possible.

All this makes it even more important that full, healthy sleep is a focus of our families’ daily routines.

Reason 1: Your parent brain will work better

When we get great sleep, our brains produce more of a protein called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). It’s a molecule responsible for forming new neurons in the brain (neurogenesis) and boosting the brain’s ability to adapt and grow in response practice and new environments (neuroplasticity).

It increases with the total amount of sleep and REM sleep you get. You can trick your body and brain into getting more total sleep by taking different sleep supplements, but getting more REM sleep requires you to take care of your stress levels (get on a meditation routine), eating times (don’t eat late), and alcohol intake (the less the better). Studies also show that stress reduces BDNF by disrupting our sleep, and the interplay of stress and poor sleep can contribute to depression.

Reason 2: Poor sleep affects kids’ moods

The amount of sleep, its quality, and its timing each have substantial effects on mood for both kids and adults.

Feelings of anxiety or depression, or outbursts of anger or sadness, can all be caused by poor sleep. Sometimes we think the world is crashing down when all we need is some really good sleep.

By focusing on great sleep not just for kids but for ourselves as well, we’re setting everyone up for extra smiles.

Reason 3: Poor sleep affects kids’ grades

Research clearly shows that poor sleep keeps us from being able to combine new experiences and information with old ones, which in turn keeps us from being able to learn.

This correlation between sleep and brain health has been shown in laboratory settings, and in real-world settings of schools and home life. Sleep duration, sleep quality, and sleep consistency are all associated with better grades. Sleep is a powerful academic performance enhancer!

Reason 4: Great sleep promotes kids’ growth

The brain releases growth hormone during deep sleep, and different cells in the body regenerate during different sleep stages.

Only long, high-quality sleep will allow the brain to cycle through all five stages of sleep multiple times. Prioritizing sleep is prioritizing a strong, healthy body.

Reason 5: Sleep gets disrupted during the school year

Unfortunately, our kids face a huge roadblock to great sleep every single year: school. Studies show that sleep is especially disrupted for kids when the school year starts. Experts recommend that parents watch bedtimes closely throughout the school year and try to make weekend bedtimes as similar to weekday bedtimes as possible.

All this makes it even more important that full, healthy sleep is a focus of our families’ daily routines.

Reason 1: Your parent brain will work better

When we get great sleep, our brains produce more of a protein called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). It’s a molecule responsible for forming new neurons in the brain (neurogenesis) and boosting the brain’s ability to adapt and grow in response practice and new environments (neuroplasticity).

It increases with the total amount of sleep and REM sleep you get. You can trick your body and brain into getting more total sleep by taking different sleep supplements, but getting more REM sleep requires you to take care of your stress levels (get on a meditation routine), eating times (don’t eat late), and alcohol intake (the less the better). Studies also show that stress reduces BDNF by disrupting our sleep, and the interplay of stress and poor sleep can contribute to depression.

Reason 2: Poor sleep affects kids’ moods

The amount of sleep, its quality, and its timing each have substantial effects on mood for both kids and adults.

Feelings of anxiety or depression, or outbursts of anger or sadness, can all be caused by poor sleep. Sometimes we think the world is crashing down when all we need is some really good sleep.

By focusing on great sleep not just for kids but for ourselves as well, we’re setting everyone up for extra smiles.

Reason 3: Poor sleep affects kids’ grades

Research clearly shows that poor sleep keeps us from being able to combine new experiences and information with old ones, which in turn keeps us from being able to learn.

This correlation between sleep and brain health has been shown in laboratory settings, and in real-world settings of schools and home life. Sleep duration, sleep quality, and sleep consistency are all associated with better grades. Sleep is a powerful academic performance enhancer!

Reason 4: Great sleep promotes kids’ growth

The brain releases growth hormone during deep sleep, and different cells in the body regenerate during different sleep stages.

Only long, high-quality sleep will allow the brain to cycle through all five stages of sleep multiple times. Prioritizing sleep is prioritizing a strong, healthy body.

Reason 5: Sleep gets disrupted during the school year

Unfortunately, our kids face a huge roadblock to great sleep every single year: school. Studies show that sleep is especially disrupted for kids when the school year starts. Experts recommend that parents watch bedtimes closely throughout the school year and try to make weekend bedtimes as similar to weekday bedtimes as possible.

All this makes it even more important that full, healthy sleep is a focus of our families’ daily routines.

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